11 Quirky Truths About Being A Writer

101 Books

After a decade or so of doing this writing thing, I’ve decided that writers are a unique lot. We’re kind of weird, wouldn’t you agree?

Recently I noticed some of my own quirks and thought I’d write them down.

But, certainly, these can’t just be truths about me, right? Certainly, you guys who write deal with the same stuff, right? I’m not the only one, am I?

You tell me if you’ve noticed the same things:

View original post 183 more words

Punctuation, Ranked

101 Books

Not all punctuation is created equal. In relation to English grammar, I believe some punctuation just flat out sucks and should rarely be used.

That’s what today’s post is about. This is a bare bones, no frills, blunt, completely subjective look at the deep, seedy, grimey world of English punctuation.

I’ll rank the ten most often used pieces of punctuation from bottom to top:

View original post 968 more words

Gone Girl (2014)

Blogging for a Good Book

gone girlIn many of director David Fincher’s films, there’s an aura of unease; the sense that what you’re seeing onscreen can’t be trusted and the real story is far more sinister than you’ve been led to believe. In The Game (1997), an investment banker is led down a nightmarish rabbit hole after signing up for a virtual reality game. In The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), based on Stieg Larsson’s novel, a disgraced journalist uncovers dark family secrets while investigating a mysterious disappearance. A similar sense of unease hangs over his latest film Gone Girl, a dark and haunting adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s equally dark and haunting bestselling novel.

Andrew has already reviewed Flynn’s book, so I will keep the plot description to a minimum. The film opens with Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) heading to work at the bar he runs with his twin sister Margo (Carrie Coon)…

View original post 350 more words

Infographic: When Did Famous Authors Publish Their Breakthrough Novels?

101 Books

This is a fascinating infographic that was sent my way.

The graphic shows the age at which dozens of famous authors wrote their first book, their first breakthrough book, in which years of life they published other books, and when they died.

It gives you a good idea of how prolific some writers are—to a fault, in some cases, I would say.

You can view the full infographic at BlinkBox Books by clicking on the image below.


Explore the careers of some of the world’s most successful authors. Click image to open interactive version (via Blinkbox Books).

Some thoughts:

View original post 148 more words

Was Edgar Allen Poe Really That Weird?

Dysfunctional Literacy

(image via wikimedia) (image via wikimedia)

Every time I take a selfie, I end up looking like Edgar Allen Poe.  It hurts my feelings.  After close to 50 years of posing in a mirror, I still can’t get my facial expressions right.  Maybe it’s my fault for trying to take a selfie in the first place.  I’m too old for that, I know, but I’d feel better if I didn’t look like Edgar Allen Poe. I mean, yeah, he was a prolific author.  He arguably created the detective story genre.  People still read his stories/poems 150 years after his death.  But people think he’s weird.

If I look like somebody famous when I take a selfie, I don’t think I want it to be somebody who’s that weird.  But maybe I’m wrong.   Was Edgar Allen Poe really that weird, or is his weirdness exaggerated?

First of all, some people think Poe is weird because…

View original post 1,021 more words